Archive

DevBlog

I feel like these monthly devblogs have been getting away from me a bit. From now on I’m going to just nail the date down here and say I’m going to always have these up by the 10th, since that gives me plenty of time to recover from the traditional rent panic and wrap up whatever loose ends I want to have before the post goes up.

Anyway.

I guess the first thing that should be said is immediately after spending last month’s DevBlog complaining about being unable to increase the framerate, I went and did the extremely obvious thing that I mentioned in that post and that,  unsurprisingly, boosted the framerate massively. It’s still not a stable 60 frames a second, but it gets there on some of the more bare-bones levels and is stable above 50 on some of the more complex ones so it’s fine. Of course, I immediately tanked that framerate back down to 30 or so by engaging in a month-long project to add a sweet water effect to the game. In fact, the entirety of the last month has been spent on working on this sweet water effect.

This effect is achieved with a combination of copying and flipping the screen buffer, overlaying a texture on top, applying a displacement map on top of that to warp the image, and then running that through a color matrix filter. I’ve fixed a lot of the slowdown by cutting the draw area down to just the section of screen that needs to be drawn, rather than drawing the whole screen worth of water and then masking the parts I need out, but it could still use some more optimization. I’m a bit frustrated that this effect is taking so long to get working, during which I’m not making ‘content’, but I’m also pretty happy – this water effect is actually something I’ve been thinking about for a long time, and honestly now that I’ve got something in place I can think of a lot of rather interesting applications beyond the obvious. The ripples and displacements might be applied to make grass ripple in the wind, the reflections can be used for other reflective surfaces, and the improvements I’m making to the particle system to allow entities (like the water) to spawn particles for special effects will have limitless applications.

There’s still some work left to be done here. I have the architecture in place to add splashing effects and whatnot as entities enter and exit the water area, but these effects have yet to be tested or implemented. With that major revision done, further work on the water system will probably mostly be in the vein of tweaks and refactoring, which I can do gradually as needed over the life of the project. Some glistening white areas might also be nice, but I’ll probably add that to a wishlist for later. Next, I’ll be focusing on really building out the first few areas of the game and ensuring the first couple enemies function properly. i am, of course, months behind the project planning schedule I had earlier devised, but at this point I’m just trying to maintain morale and make steady progress – I can see about working harder and faster as I gain aptitude with (and slowly improve) my tool set.

It’s been a rough month for the project. I’ve been feeling the least motivation to work seriously on it that I have in a long time, and there’s probably a number of reasons for this, ranging from stressing out about volatile political conditions to worrying about money to being distracted by very good video games. However, I think the biggest thing undermining my motivation is lack of confidence in the technical side of the project, and I’m still figuring out what to do about that.

See, I’m building this project in Adobe AIR, which is essentially the same thing as Flash but repackaged for local installation instead of streaming. There’s a lot good to be said about AIR, and a number of good games have been made in it, but over time it’s felt like I’m struggling more and more against it, being limited by its weaknesses while not taking advantage of its strengths. I’m starting to question (again) whether I should be working in this environment at all. The past month has been a struggle to get the framerate up over 60fps. Originally I had believed that once I got my multi-threaded solution working it would just happen. Then I thought that once I got my multi-threaded solution optimized it would happen. Then I thought that once I went through and optimized everything else it would happen.

Now I’m thinking it might just not happen – at least, not with the amount of individual animated details I want to have in each level, and/or not with the lighting system blending in on top. There may be another way to handle the lighting issue, so I’ll look into that. I also can probably improve performance somewhat by more carefully culling draw operations that would take place outside of the screen space. I can try those things, but it’s time to start carefully considering what I do if they don’t work. I’m slightly tempted to try to port the engine into some new architecture/environment, though I probably won’t. I may experiment with getting it running in OpenFL again, since that gives me a lot more opportunities for optimization, but I probably won’t remake the entire thing running in C and SDL…

Probably.

So, what do I have to show for this last month? (A bit more than a month, actually, since this devblog is a week late). I did all of the animations left to get the basic mask enemy working (though the enemy itself still needs some work since the behavior doesn’t work quite right), fixed a number of bugs, finished getting the multi-threaded particle system running and fixed performance problems therein, and made some performance improvements. It’s not a very productive month, but they can’t all be I guess.

But what’s next? What’s my plan to get out of this funk?

Most immediately, I’m going to go in and see if some judicious culling of draw operations can improve the framerate. Then I’m going to see if I can figure out how to do some decent looking water. Then I start building out the early levels, adding details, fixing up the mask entity so it feels good, and perhaps starting work on getting another enemy working.

There’s still so much to do, and I don’t feel like I have any momentum. But who ever starts with momentum? It’s something you pick up along the way.

In a bit of a weird spot right now. I’ve been working on doing the animations for the first and likely most complex non-boss enemy of the game, and I’m starting to feel a bit depressed about it. Working on a bunch of very simple very similar pictures for a few weeks tends to get old, even if you feel proud of the result. I ran into this same issue working on the main character animations, and now as with then I’m going to have to figure out more kinds of work to mix in because this is starting to undermine my motivation to work on the project. I need to remember never to leave myself on the same animation task for more than a week or so, since it tends to do terrible things to my morale after a little while.

Because these guys aren’t quite symmetrical, but I didn’t want to create left and right facing versions, some interesting properties emerged. The most noticeable of these is where they actually momentarily drop their knife and then catch it in their other hand in the running turn animation, which nicely adds to the frantic and panicked feel of the animation and swaps hands so that when they run the other direction it looks natural. The strap holding up their clothing also quietly changes shoulder, and the light shifts to the other side of them, during the turn. I think these weird fudgings of reality will largely be invisible in action, but it was an interesting problem to figure out as I went, since I hadn’t really considered it before.

I had originally planned to make several different shapes of mask for these guys, but I think that’s something I’m unlikely to do now. To create each mask I’d have to do a bunch of drawings of the mask facing in different directions for the turn, add code to make it draw in front of or behind the head based on where they are in the current animation, and make sure the movement perfectly syncs up. That’s possible, but seems like a lot of work for something that might not look very good. Alternately I could just make a bunch of different animations for different masks, which, again, I don’t think will be worth the effort. That said, there are alternate versions of this enemy with different capabilities, so when I make them I can make their masks look different, which will be more communicative and less labor intensive than what I was planning on doing.

That’s mostly it for the last month, though I also did some miscellaneous work fixing bugs in path-finding, improving the cave tileset and building out the caves. The particle system is basically functional but is still not really an improvement on what I had before I started in any way, remaining extremely buggy when run in multi-threaded mode while still not quite performing as well as I’d hoped – for reasons which, as yet, remain mysterious.

I think for the next week or so I should focus on getting all of the editors working  so that I can spend some time detailing the levels, adding foreground and background elements, generally making them feel finished – or as finished as they’re going to get until I finish making enemies for them.

I like these animations, but they’re not much to show for the better part of a month or work. I don’t know what to think about that: It doesn’t feel like I’ve been slacking. Maybe these guys were just difficult to animate.

EveHeader

I’m doing a terrible job of sticking to the schedule I came up with. I keep getting sidetracked by new tasks, improvements or things I forgot to put on the schedule. This last month, I finally got around to looking up what sorts of multi-threading solutions are available in Haxe/AIR. It turns out that Adobe AIR has supported multi-threading for a while now, with an implementation that is both very straightforward and kind of frustrating. AIR’s version of multi-threading is: Load another AIR program into your running program, and pass values back and forth. Simple enough in concept, but it still has all the traditional concerns of multi-threading with sharing resources and managing access.

So, much of this past month has been taken up with trying to get my particle system, the most demanding discrete subsystem of EverEnding, running in a separate thread. It took a lot of thought and experimentation to figure out a way to restructure a system which had presumed open access to a shared memory pool and make it run remotely with operations mediated by a single point of communication. After a week or two I got it running, but… not especially well. The benefit of the new system is a bump from 45fps to 50fps, which is not as dramatic or life-changing as I’d hoped — plus, for some reason, there are spikes of 30-50ms, which make the overall effect still somewhat disjointed and unpleasant. Still, I think these problems will be fixable, though it may be tricky to figure out exactly how they’re manifesting.

Aside from that I’ve mostly been working on building out the last section of the first area, the caves. I think I’m finally starting to nail down a paradigm of tile design for this game, based around the idea of areas which are lit, areas which are dark, and areas which are somewhere in between. Lit areas are mostly on the upper right and dark areas mostly on the lower left, with various transitional tiles to make them flow smoothly from one to the next. The cave tileset is starting to come together, though certain tiles still need some work. The background could use some improvement as well.

caves00

Also, looking back through my daily devblog notes, apparently I worked on collision in February as well. Strange, it feels like much more than a ago now. Well, most of the collision improvements are in place and working, but in the process some things broke, so those will need to be re-fixed. It’s basically guaranteed that any time I work on collision code I’ll end up frustrated.

So what’s next? I’ll probably focus on developing the level architecture and tilesets until I’m completely done with the caves, then go back and focus on populating this first area with enemies and details. Along the way somewhere I’ll spend a few days fixing all the things I broke getting the new particle system implemented and see if I can fix weird glitches there, as well as maybe a bit more collision work (sigh).

EveHeader

It’s been kind of a strange month for the project. I’ve made next to no progress on the task list I’ve created for the game, but I’m still largely satisfied with the work I’ve done. That is to say, I’ve been putting a lot of time in on things that it hadn’t previously occurred to me I would need, so I can’t really cross anything off a list when I get it done, but nevertheless the tasks I’ve done needed doing.

So, what are these tasks?

  • Created a system to modify hue/saturation/brightness of animations, and implemented controls for this into existing particle systems and associated editors, as well as creating a similar system for modifying tileset colors
  • Fixed up the detail editor to make it more flexible and easy to use, including the ability to modify multiple details at once
  • Created a seeded random number generator so particle systems that use random numbers will generate consistently from one play to the next
  • Created a simple collision system for particles, which can be used to make them only spawn on top of tiles or perform special behaviors when they collide with tiles
  • Added the ability to have particle behaviors that only trigger once on spawn rather than updating continuously
  • Collision improvements and implementation of water tiles and combination platform/slope tiles
  • Fixed the way perspective is calculated on details to center the vanishing point rather than have it locked to the upper left
  • Stripped out a non-functional zoom in/out system in favor of a much simpler one that actually works
colorchange

With all these color controls I have a lot more ability to customize areas without creating all-new assets

On top of that I’ve been building levels out, which is on the list but also takes a long time to make progress on. It’s really difficult to say much about the process of building levels, because 90% of it is just spent on making sure tile boundaries line up and making tiny aesthetic tweaks. In that way it’s a lot like working on the animations after I created prototype animations: All of the concept is mostly there, I just need to elevate it to finished quality.

I’m getting close to the end of my ad-hoc list of unexpected and unscheduled problems/improvements, so I ought to be getting back to the game schedule soon. Worst case scenario is I’m a month behind of where I wanted to be: Best case scenario is that I end up making up the time I lost by leveraging some of the improvements I’ve made. We’ll see. In any case, I’m probably going to be spending the coming month or two getting early-game enemies fully animated and operational. The first couple of enemies will be the most difficult by far, I believe – after those are complete I should be able to copy and paste from them for almost everything I’ll ever need an enemy to do.

 

EveHeader

It’s been a bit of a slow month for work on the EverEnding project for reasons which are largely obvious. About 10 days of the last 30 were taken up with a big holiday trip, under which circumstances I wasn’t really able to find the time and energy to work on the project – and, what’s more, left me tired and inert enough that I didn’t get much done for a while after either. That being said, progress is starting to be made, and certain foundational parts of the game are coming together.

So, to start with: The main character animations for chapter 1 are pretty much all done. I say ‘pretty much’ because I’m confident that as time passes I will notice improvements that need to be made, possibly even new animations that need to be created. However, for the time being that all-important part of the project is complete.

Once I achieved that, I turned my attention towards various outstanding programming tasks that have been on my to-do list for some time. I finally found and fixed a very annoying bug that was causing entities to self-replicate when I saved a level I was editing, which was causing massive slowdown since the entire lighting system was getting duplicated several times over. I found and fixed another bug which was causing the background layer of levels to not match the size of the foreground layer, and also created a player profile system, which should be able to handle saving and loading all the necessary information for game progression alongside all of the player’s controller/keyboard binding information. Somewhere in the midst of all this, I built a bunch of assets for the early areas of the game – mostly pretty simple ones, which makes them excellent test cases for the kinds of improvements I’ll need to make to the details system to get levels looking the way I want them to.

01-05-2017-standing-stones

I’m noticing something strange now that I’ve finished the main character animations: Even though I frequently found the work tedious, having something straightforward, relatively brain-dead, and indisputably important to the core of the game to work on was actually incredibly useful. When I was feeling tired or dull or confused it was still totally feasible to get good work done just by focusing on creating animations. That is not to say that animating is easy or stupid work, but I’d already planned out all the animations such that easy and stupid work was mostly the only kind left to do on them to complete them. Now that I don’t have these animation tasks to rely upon, I feel a bit cast adrift on the gigantic task list that is this project.

Oh well, I’m sure I’ll hit a new rhythm soon enough. I think building out the levels may be similarly straightforward and rewarding, though the level editing tools may need a bit of improvement before I can dedicate myself fully to that work. Perhaps those improvements should be my first priority, then, after I get the core game systems I’m currently focused on up and running.

EveHeader

This post is a few days late, and there’s several reasons for that. I mean, first, I just forgot for a couple of days, but there’s actually a good reason too. Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been participating in the Idle Thumbs Wizard Jam, a 2-week game creation event. For the early days I was just working on my project concurrently with all of the stuff I normally work on, but near the end I was really hammering on the project. Anyway, it’s a small project but I’m quite pleased with how it turned out. You can check it out here. New versions may be forthcoming once I recover from the last few days, but in the meanwhile I need to take a break and catch up on other work.

I may actually start doing these a bit later in the month as actual policy rather than accident. Ends of months tend to be rather congested – I may start just scheduling these updates for the 5th of each month instead of the 1st.

Anyway, I still got plenty of work done before the Jam and during its early days. While I’m not as ahead of schedule as I’d hoped to be, I think I’m still comfortably within the parameters I’ve set, with 34/51 tasks done for this three-month block and 8 preemptively done for the next three-month block. At this point, all of the right-facing animations are complete, and I’m well on my way to finishing the left-facing animations, with just the hit stun, defeat, and harvest animations left to complete. Also, a few new animations were created when I noticed the motion seemed less than fluid, such as an animation for landing from a jump or completing a rising attack. I foresee no difficulties finishing the player character animations this month, though I do expect to have to spend a few days polishing up the animations and fixing minor continuity errors once I have them mostly done. Aside from that animation work, most of what needs to be done to keep on schedule is creating a couple more simple tilesets and building out some of the early levels at finished quality.

standing-harvest-loop-right