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Animation

We’re at the end of the first official month of development of the current version of EverEnding. That’s a lot of qualifiers, but it’s still a milestone of sorts. Did it go well, you may ask? Did it go poorly? Kind of in-between!

Most of this month was focused on creating the intro sequence, but before I even started in on that I first wrapped up what I was working on at the end of last month, the crouching animation, even though it really doesn’t need to be done until I start on the first chapter of the game.

Once I have my teeth in a problem, I really don’t like to abandon it until I’ve solved it – a tendency which kind of backfired later on. However, having accomplished that, I started developing the different graphical elements of the intro area, making a dynamic and playable version of the first test screen which was previously just a placed static image. Here’s a comparison of what it looked like before and what it looks like now:

I started with the tree, which I’ve always liked the look of but which was cut off at the edges on this screen since I’d originally drawn it on a paper pad and ran out of space. I extended the top of the tree and added layered systems of branches, then drew several different leaf clumps which I spawn in-game using a particle system. It turns out most of these leaves aren’t actually visible from the main intro area, but I think I’ll probably pan the camera down to this area at the beginning, which will show off the leaves and branches nicely. There’s some aspects I still like better in the old version, such as the overall level of saturation and contrast on the tree and the gradient in the sky background, which I’ll probably try to bring back in as I develop these assets further.

I quickly drew the night sky background, which was mostly scribbling, and somewhat less quickly I constructed fill and edge textures for the dirt, and then built the terrain using Unity’s Spriteshape tool. I had been concerned about the quality of effect this tool would provide, but I honestly couldn’t be happier with how the ground segments turned out. A point of interest is that SpriteShape used carelessly can make the edges of the collision area misleading, so I tried to make it clear via shading what the actual collision edge of the ground surface was.

Previously the main ground area had been grassy, but I figured with the special grass particle effect I developed a short while back I might be better served by leaving it as dirt and then having the grass effect handle all the grass rendering. I may reconsider this at a later date – and the grass effect itself is surely still subject to change – but the dirt ground asset will be useful later regardless. I haven’t created any rocks to replace those in the initial version – they’re not vitally important, but I probably should, especially since I’m certain to need rock elements to place later anyway.

Probably the most time this month was spent wrestling with the rendering system. While the initial simple sprite look was appealing, I couldn’t and can’t stop thinking about how incredible it could look with some extra post-processing and shadowing effects. By copying a shader I didn’t understand well I could get these effects but only at the cost of clipping away the transparency at the edge of the sprites in a fairly hideous way, and one which will cause much more severe problems as I add more assets with transparency effects later on. I still haven’t figured out a perfect solution to this, and it’s a rabbit hole I could get in deep – after all, people build entire careers specializing in this sort of graphics programming – but I’ll probably keep pursuing it both because I think the results could be worth it and because I find this kind of work inherently interesting.

The crux of the issue is that in order to properly post-process an image with certain effects, you need to draw to the ‘depth texture’. In order to make objects draw one in front of another, you need to draw to the ‘depth/z buffer’, which it turns out is a completely different thing… And, in order to draw transparent objects, one would normally avoid drawing to either the depth texture or the z buffer, because it would overwrite information about objects behind the transparent object which you still want to draw because your object is transparent! In layman’s terms: In order to know what something should look like, the game needs to know how far away it is, but it can only know the distance of one thing at a time, so: If we’re holding a piece of semitransparent glass in front of an apple, how far away is the thing it should be drawing? Is it the distance from the glass to the camera, or is it the distance from the apple to the camera?

The only solution that seems viable to me is to set a transparency threshold: If it’s barely transparent at all, like a piece of stretched rubber, then it counts for depth, and if it’s very transparent indeed, like glass, then it doesn’t. However, just knowing this as an algorithm isn’t enough, because you still need to know how to explain to the graphics hardware what behavior you want – and that’s what I’ve been struggling with, because it has very particular ideas about what information you can feed it and how.

I’m not sure how well this problem is coming across in text, so hopefully next month I can just show you a picture of the working version to illustrate what I mean.

I also started getting sound and music implemented. Now, the intro’s sound and music needs are pretty minimal, basically just requiring one music track and one long sound effect to be played, but I started seriously considering what the music system would need to look like to handle future problems. Even in the very first playable area there’s some degree of adaptive music, and later areas have other types of dynamic music planned, from transitional segments to cross-fading alternate tracks and more as I think of them. Altogether, these represent a not-insignificant programming task – and, in Unity, requires some rather awkward queuing and loading of audio tracks. I decided that it was foolish to try to create a music system like this when there’s already incredibly powerful tools made for this specific purpose out there, so, after a quick assessment of its licensing options, I began integrating FMOD, an adaptive music system for games, into the project. This system is free for small-scale projects like this, and in addition to adaptive music provides great tools for mixing sound effects together and slight dynamic tweaking of sound parameters based on arbitrary values – so, for instance, one can not merely adapt music by creating alternate tracks, but also by bumping equalizer and filter parameters based on in-game actions. FMOD also provides an actual tool for visualizing these mixes and setting up musical transitions, which is great because manually plugging values into an XML script on my first attempt at this was a real drag.

Finally, I started considering how text was going to work. This seems like it should be a freebie – there’s some pretty standardized ways of handling text in games at this point – but, for this project, I want a sort of living storybook feel, with text appearing on the page as you encounter it. First, I needed to figure out how to just get text on the screen, which ended up being fairly easy since Unity includes TextMeshPro, a great solution for solving exactly this problem in 2d and 3d spaces. However, when text is on a background that could be any color, just black print doesn’t really cut it, so I spent quite a while looking through different fonts and rendering styles until I found a couple that worked for the two main ‘voices’ I need to have at the start of the game – though I’m still undecided whether these parts will also have voice acting.

After this I created a simple class to fade in the text over time – and then worried it should have been even simpler, since for some unfathomable reason I made it so text faded in over a set total amount of time instead of at a predictable rate, meaning it would be nearly impossible to sync up between fields of different length. As soon as I started thinking about all this, though, I started thinking about the way it should be, about what the optimal interface and feature set ought to be for a tool like this. This is a trap! This exact behavior is why I was talking in the last devblog about trying to treat this project as a series of game-jam-esque sprints, and why I said my tendency to fixate on problems once I approach them causes issues: Because this is the sort of thing you don’t do in a game jam. Not only is this a far more refined solution than is immediately needed, but trying to create it pushed me into writing code for Unity’s internal UI system again which is an invariably soul-crushing practice since getting anything done in there is such a finicky and arbitrary mess. I realized all this after a couple of days, and left this text fading in a state where it’s not quite as perfect as I would want it to be if I were selling it as a product – but is still quite sufficient for my immediate needs.

One could reasonably ask: Why focus on creating an introduction before completing any playable areas? I will preface the explanation by saying that I don’t believe this is the correct approach, and might in fact argue that it’s a very incorrect approach. Generally speaking, I would prefer to start with the core gameplay, build up playable areas, and expand out from there. However, right now I’ve already essentially created a gameplay prototype with the initial AIR version of the game: I don’t know if the gameplay is going to work on the macro level, IE will engagements with enemies be interesting and will the overall flow of play be interesting, but the prototype gameplay has been enough to convince me that the simple act of moving around the world will be satisfying. In addition to these basic gameplay systems, though, there are narrative systems – which are usually considered as an afterthought, but which also need to be developed and tested. Developing the intro will a) create a distinct chunk of the game, albeit a relatively unimportant one, b) force me to create the structure of the narrative systems, and c) create a free-standing piece that should hopefully build enthusiasm for the project – both for myself and for potential audiences.

Because I got so focused on trying to get specific tasks completed correctly, instead of merely functionally, I didn’t reach my original goal of completing the intro by the beginning of this month – but I don’t think I’m actually that far off. I had originally conceived of this beginning bit as being largely just text, but with a bit of reflection I’ve realized that would be an incredibly boring and tedious start to the game, so I now have a sequence planned where the camera slowly pans down to the intro screen, across text displays, and with cuts to certain illustrations I have yet to make. This is conceptually still pretty simple – and honestly probably doesn’t sound very exciting, described in this bare-bones manner – but should be more exciting and intriguing than just a few lines of suggestive dialogue, and I think with a deft touch could be really cool. The current intro music is almost 2 minutes long, which I’m starting to suspect may be too long to actually fit this sequence without messing up the timing – so I may also need to rewrite it to accommodate this.

Thus, to complete the intro, I need to make 3 illustrations and a couple more minor pieces of art, possibly tweak some assets, animate the camera transitions and text fade ins, add some sound effects, and then edit the music track to fit. I think all this is achievable within one week. Once this is complete I’ll start in on the first area – which, at first, will mostly be animation work while I complete and implement all of the standard character animations.

In all honesty, my mood has been all over the place recently – for obvious reasons. It’s nice to have something concrete to work on, like a ship in a bottle, while being otherwise locked in place.

If you’d like to help support this project or my writing, please consider supporting me on Patreon. Support at any level lets you read new posts one week early and adds your name to the list of supporters on the sidebar.

Where We Were

A little bit more than a year ago – actually, almost a year and a half ago – I decided to put EverEnding on hiatus in favor of working on a series of monthly projects. This worked out for a while, but before too long I was having a harder and harder time building anything significant up by the end of the month, a harder and harder time staying motivated when it seemed like I just kept finding new ways to not make anything substantial. I quietly dropped the monthly project component of the Patreon shortly after completing the album last year – I figured it was better to not promise than to be unable to deliver.

I quietly picked EverEnding back up and started working on it around six months ago, but this time rebuilding the project in Unity. I resisted this change for a long time, mostly because when I started this project Unity’s support for 2d graphics and flexibility seemed to be insufficient for what I had in mind, seemed to present obstacles that I would struggle with and be distracted from the main work of completing the project. This was, in retrospect, the wrong choice – though I certainly would have had to struggle with Unity, the fact was I had to struggle with Flash/AIR a lot too, probably a lot more, and for less impressive results.

I’m not sure why I felt so strongly about these bad decisions, why I didn’t take a week long ago to explore what I could do in Unity and how it would compare to what I was doing already. Perhaps it was fear of having wasted my time – the result of which being, naturally, that I’ve wasted far more time. The fact is, though, that the Flash/AIR version was never what I wanted the game to be. Even before making significant progress, I had dreams of an HD version that used sprites much nicer than the inept pixel art I was forced into due to the limitations of Flash/AIR – or perhaps the limitations of my understanding, but limitations in either case.

So it’s happened. I’m remaking the game, redoing massive amounts of work, throwing away even more. It’s somewhat upsetting. It still feels like I’m stuck in slow motion, and that the shape of the project barely changes from week to week because there’s still so much work to do, but there’s one crucial difference: The game that is getting made now actually looks like what I imagined when I envisioned it.

I also walked away from the monthly project experience knowing that, though I may struggle much of the time, I can sometimes create substantial works within a month-long window. While I’d always broken the game up into chapters, I’m now considering each chapter to be a month-long (or, in some cases, 2-month or 3-month-long) project – eventually. Right now I’m still working on getting basic functionality and character animations into place, working on constructing a foundation to build off of.

If I were a stranger reading what I was writing now, I’d be rolling my eyes a bit. Of course – this time it will be different! It won’t be like last time I said I had a plan, last time I said I had deadlines to hit and last time I said I would work to have chapter 1 finished by the end of the year. I can’t help but notice, putting together the samples for this post, the long line of old samples, old components and demos, stretching all the way back to 2012 when I started it. Almost 8 years ago, now, that I’ve been working on this project. What the fuck? There’s clearly something wrong with my approach. Each year passes and I get no closer, and I repeat myself, and I repeat myself repeating myself. What can I do? How do I know this time will be different? How do I know I’ll do better, get closer, move faster?

I don’t. I can’t. I’m just doing my best, trying different angles, testing approaches, seeing what works, and hopefully getting a bit better every time. I want to finish this project – not merely to have it done, but also to feel okay about moving on to other projects. The only way to do that is to move forward, one step at a time.

Where We Are

Rather than dwell on all the things I haven’t done, or the things I’ve done incompletely or still need to do, let’s talk about some of the things I’ve done since I restarted the project. I’ve been focusing on getting foundations and special effects done so I don’t have to worry about them later: Foundations I’ve completed include collision, which I had to basically redo from the ground up because Unity’s default colliders weren’t suitable and I was no longer working off of the tile system that a lot of the old collision system was premised on, player movement which I could mostly copy from the previous project with minor tweaks, and the camera system which I was able to quickly use Unity’s Cinemachine package to make a decent version of.

Additionally, and this was the most significant challenge, I found Unity’s default animation tool MecAnim to be unsuitable for 2d animations, since the tools that provide smooth transition between different 3d animations were useless and the transitions didn’t provide a lot of the tools I was used to having from my custom animation tools from the earlier version of the project – so I built a new animation system. That is to say, I built a new system on top of Unity’s system to handle the conditional logic for playing 2d animations. The difficult part of this was learning how to modify editor windows in Unity, which uses a completely different paradigm than I was used to from working in Flash and which I had to learn a more complicated approach to than most available sample projects online use. There’s still some bugs in this tool, and probably a few features to be added, but once I complete it I will probably add it to the Unity asset store, since I expect it to be useful to others as well – though I’m not really sure yet how to make it discoverable to those who might make use of it.

These are all things that needed to be done before any significant progress in developing the game can happen. In addition, I’m still working on creating the fundamental movement animation set – those animations which will let me see the character move around in the environment and play-test in a somewhat finished way. These probably don’t technically need to be done before I can start building out the in-game environments, but if I want to pursue this series-of-vertical-slices approach to building the game they are an obvious starting point.

In addition, I’ve built a couple of special effects that are probably going to feature heavily in the project, especially early on. I’ve created a particle effect for grass blowing in the wind and a special set of shaders for a 2d water effect that will be necessary for developing the first areas of the game (examples of both of these are viewable if you click the preceding text).

Where We’re Going

In the immediate future, for the first vertical slice, I’ll need to:

  1. Player Animations:

    1. Crouching left/right
    2. Standing left/right
    3. Stopping (after run) left/right
    4. Turning left/right
    5. Rolling left/right (maybe)
  2. Version of the first area (visible in the screenshot at the top of this post) that’s not a single background image and actually contains multiple elements that can move independently of one another.

  3. Chop up the tree component and rig the branches up as kinematic springs, so that they can sway to breeze or other movement

  4. Particle effect for the surrounding chunks of stone during the intro

  5. Sound Effects:

    1. Grass footsteps

    2. Grass landing/jump

    3. Earthquake

  6. Basic menu system

    1. Volume settings music/sound
    1. Rendering settings template

    2. Control rebinding placeholder

    3. Quit game

  7. Simple music playback behavior

  8. System for displaying timed text during the intro

  9. Intro text

  10. Record VO to accompany text (maybe?)

I was going to follow this up by including a breakdown of what’s necessary for the next vertical slice of the game, being approximately 1/3rd of the first chapters of the game, but it ended up being far too much information to conveniently include here. Suffice to say the second of these vertical slices is going to be the real obstacle, and is probably best approached as a three-month project in itself – and even that’s optimistic. That being said, it’s probably the biggest hurdle and the single biggest component of the project, so future vertical slices should go faster if I can get it done. I may end up attempting to vertically slice this vertical slice to try to get it down to one or two months.

In the meanwhile, I’m going to be trying to get this list complete by the end of the month, and hope it all adds up to something close to what I’m imagining. I haven’t decided yet if I’ll release these as playable builds to patrons or just make gameplay videos or perhaps some staggered deployment of both – still considering how to actually put this project out into the world. This is all daunting to keep in mind, but I’ve at least caught the tail of what I’m trying to achieve.

If you’d like to help support this project or my writing, please consider supporting me on Patreon. Support at any level lets you read new posts one week early and adds your name to the list of supporters on the sidebar.

Another month has gone by, and though a short vacation, a nasty little cold, and a number of other minor distractions got in my way, I still managed to make a little bit of progress.

First, and most importantly, I put quite a few hours into writing the music for the first boss of the game. I may have gone a little bit overboard on this one: The concept I wanted to pursue was a track with multiple phases that mapped to different parts of the boss encounter, bouncing back and forth between them until finally reaching a conclusion. I’m not sure if I can possibly create a boss encounter that stays interesting long enough to accompany this track, coming in at almost 9 minutes long, but it will be fun to try once the rest of the chapter is complete.

The phases of the track are:

0:00-1:47 Intro
1:47-4:13 The Chest
4:13-6:16 The Mask
6:16-7:49 The Heart
7:49-8:40 Conclusion

This one honestly ended up getting quite a bit out of hand, and I spent quite a bit more time than I’d originally expected to on it, but I’m quite pleased with how it turned out. I also just enjoyed doing music work again! I’m going to carry on with composing the soundtrack even though I’ve effectively completed all the tracks for the first chapter of the game now, which is the part of the game I’m focused on finishing. The reasons why I’m going to continue doing music work, despite otherwise attempting to contain my efforts to this first chapter, are several-fold: first because, as mentioned, I like making music and I want to do more of it, second because if I can’t make this game in a timely fashion I can damn sure make its soundtrack, which is a discrete sub-creation that I can be proud of in its own right, and third because I find music so compelling that I think just having the soundtrack to the game will motivate me more to finish the rest of it. There’s also a fourth, more pragmatic reason: Inspired by UNDERTALE’s soundtrack, I’m really trying to integrate motifs from different characters and locations into tracks with a narrative connection to those characters and locations. It’s going to be really hard to do that until I know what those motifs, for later parts of the game, actually are! I’m not really going to be able to consider chapter 1’s soundtrack complete until I’ve written the rest of the soundtrack and know better what my overall thematic tools and goals are.

Anyway! Aside from music, I’ve been working on a few things. I’ve been feeling my way around programming the main narrative component of the game, the storyteller. This is going to be something pretty similar to what Supergiant does in their games with an ongoing narration element, except I would like to integrate these narrator lines a little bit more closely with the music, syncing the lines up with particular parts of the track and so forth. Additionally, I want to have text appear in the world synced with the audio, so it’s a bit like playing a storybook. Figuring out how I’m going to pragmatically handle the synchronization of these elements and making them play nice with a player who may or may not be interested in the narrative taking place is going to be a challenge, but I’m getting close to having a simple version ready to test so that I can iterate on it.

I’ve also been thinking a lot about what the interface of the game is going to look like. There are really only two elements that need to be displayed under normal circumstances: The player’s current health, and how many sparks you’ve collected, which also maps to your max health. I could just have a red bar along one side of the screen, but that felt inelegant. A sphere that fills and empties like the health meter in Diablo might have been a bit more thematic, since there’s some sun/moon symbolism I’m playing with in the game, but it felt like a circle would take up a lot of screen real estate for how much info it would impart and probably wouldn’t look very good. What I’ve come up with instead is an idea that’s… actually a little bit difficult to express here. It’s basically a life bar along the left side of the screen, except it looks like an engraved stone tablet. Only a small part of the tablet is visible early on, but as you gain more power the tablet expands and you can see more of it, and the engravings on it. I can actually directly tie the health meter into the narrative of the game in what I think is a pretty interesting way. However, because you don’t gain power at a constant rate, but instead end up collecting more and more as you defeat more powerful opponents, I’m going to have to figure out a curve that reveals the tablet at a rate that’s satisfying over the course of the game. I have a logarithmic function in mind that may work well, but it will have to be tested. I’ll also need to figure out how to have the tablet build up in such a way that it feels satisfying, and ensure that no matter what its interim shape is it still gives satisfactory feedback as a health meter. This will all take a bit of experimentation, but it’s an idea I’m excited about.

Finally, I’ve been working on the game’s first animation. I mean, I’ve already built several animations, but this is the first one that will play in the game: The player character awakening, standing up, and taking her weapon at the very beginning of the game. I started creating this animation, and then had to start over after working on it for a few hours because my first take on it sucked. I think my second take on it has potential, though it’s still very rough the motion feels good to me.

The actual removing-sword part of the animation still needs to happen, and of course all of the detail and the tween frames need to be added, but I think I’m on the right track this time.

So, the plan for August is to finish working on these things, write the music for the first area of chapter 2 (I’ve already started), create more main-character animations, and maybe get some basic sound design in. Of course something else may capture my fancy and I’ll end up working on that, but as long as I stick to my big task list I think I can maintain forward progress.

This month was a completely different kind of weird month than the last weird month – but weird nonetheless.

I ended up taking around two weeks of vacation, between a planned family visit, a memorial service, and associated travel times. When I got back the entire city was blanketed in toxic smoke particles, so I had to lock myself indoors – even more so than I do habitually, and with less ventilation. And, between these trips and certain extremely stressful interpersonal conflicts, I’ve been thinking about things – about where I’m going with my life, how I want to get there, and what that will look like.

First, I should probably address the lack of posts on the blog. I could have probably kept things going, but I’ve been feeling like it’s harder and harder to come up with topics that I feel are worth writing about, to the extent that I don’t feel some of my posts are to the level of insight or quality I want them to be. If all else were equal I’d just shake it off as a bad streak, but I think it’s also just been hard to focus with all of this strife and uncertainty in my life, so I’ve put things on hiatus for a bit. I wanted to make some sort of official announcement about that, but I kept putting it off until now, when I needed to write a devblog post anyway. I intend to resume posting on the previous schedule starting in November.

Regarding my plans for the future: The game is still being made, but I also feel like I need to put a bit more into existing as a professional in the here and now rather than just in a nebulous future. Towards this end, I’ve decided to start seeking freelance work –  and, tangentially, if you would like to hire me to do any of the sorts of work you have seen/read/heard here at Problem Machine, please feel free to email me with inquiries at problem.machine@gmail.com. However, as soon as I began looking for contract work, I realized that I feel a crushing lack of confidence in what I have to show as portfolio work right now. I don’t feel like what I have done shows in any way what I am truly capable of doing – and, since I happen to have come into a bit of money recently, enough to relieve my most immediate financial pressures, for a while I will be shifting my focus from just surviving while I make my game to making my game, learning and practicing, and building my portfolio. I have a list of what I want to create over the next few months, a list I don’t really care to get into the specifics of at the moment, but which involves a number of art, programming, music, and game development tasks. Once this list is complete, I expect to have a body of work that I can be really proud of, something which, even if it isn’t outstanding in every respect, can at least be regarded as roundly workmanlike and occasionally exceptional.

Now I’m 500 words in and I haven’t really talked about the game much at all. Despite everything, I have gotten some work in on the project – mostly, at this point, developing the attack animations for the sub-types of mask enemy.

And when I say mostly, I mean entirely, since I really haven’t had more than a week or two free to actually work this month. As I’m working on building my portfolio I’ll probably have a bit less time to work on the game, but will continue to plug doggedly away at it, if for no other reason than my skull starts feeling too small for my brain if I stop for any significant length of time. It should be fairly easy to finish developing these enemies animation-wise, and then I can revisit the behavior code to fix the remaining issues with their in-game behavior, which shouldn’t be too hard. Once these guys are done, there’s only a couple more enemies to develop for the opening sections of the game, one of which is pretty simple, and I can probably refocus my attention on building up the aesthetic of the early stages. In the meanwhile, future devblog updates will probably contain samples of the work I do in building up my portfolio, which hopefully will be of interest to those of you who have been interested in the game in the first place.

It’s been a bit of a weird month. I haven’t worked deeply on much, but made a lot of slight progress on different things, and have also made some substantial revisions to the game design.

Well, first things first, I made this piece of background art:

I like how this one turned out, but I also need to make an alternate version of it for a special effect I have planned and that one is proving to be a bit difficult. A lot of these background images are almost technical problems, where I need to figure out a way to depict the idea I have in my head without getting bogged down for hours and hours, and also to depict an area that makes some sense relative to the actual navigable portion of terrain the game takes place in. This background already has taken far more time than any of the others, and the potential for an even more detailed and time-consuming version has me a bit concerned, so I’m trying to figure out a clever way to approach it..

With these concerns in mind, I decided to drop the background work for a bit and work on some animations. I began creating animations for one of the other early-game enemies, the Crawler:

This is one of very few enemies in the game what does damage on contact rather than having to do a particular attack, and is more or less completely unaggressive and minds its own business – an obstacle as much as an enemy, really. The animations aren’t quite complete yet, with the turn animation in particular being a bit of a troublesome obstacle, but it’s coming along. Once this and the mask enemy are complete, there’s only one more enemy type planned for the first couple areas of the game, so I’ll have pretty much everything I need in place to finish building out the early areas. I also spent some time building out some of the animations I’ll need for the other variations on the mask enemy, such as the stone throwing and spear throwing types, but nothing finished as of yet.

There were some other minor side-lines – a system for making it possible to modify a value from multiple locations without overwriting each other’s modifications, building a special ‘alternate reality’ effect for the second area, roughing out some of the level designs… near the end of the month, though, I realized, or perhaps merely acknowledged, a number of substantial design flaws that were threatening to undermine the game. These had to do with the upgrades I had planned, when you were likely to find them in the game, and how useful and interesting they would be. The biggest problem that emerged was that I had come up with the idea of this attack using the sling and, when I thought about how it would feel in action, I realized it was completely unsatisfactory. Essentially I was planning this whole ability which didn’t really have any role in what the player was doing – it would be the only ranged attack available, sure, but in a game where ranged attacks weren’t really necessary to succeed, and it would totally clutter up the control system.

I spent a few days thinking about this, and eventually came up with a whole new system, with a set of 4 elemental attacks and alternate forms of each attack, along with a system of special attack ‘charges’ that get restored whenever the player gets hit. I think this is a pretty good idea! But it also presents a lot of issues with, again, when the player finds upgrades and what role those upgrades play in the overall flow of the game. I’m still not 100% there with this design, but the missing pieces will probably be small things that I can fit into place as I go rather than massive gaping holes that I need to invent whole new game systems to fill.

Since then, I’ve just been reworking the way attacks are programmed to make room for this system. The new attack system is far more flexible than before, though there are probably still some ways I could improve it that I may have to consider.

This month will probably have more work on creating enemy animations, a little bit more design work figuring out what the flow of upgrades and specific properties of special attacks will be (along with whether I want to have, say, special objects that the player can interact with using said special attacks), and perhaps laying the groundwork for creating the special attacks themselves – though they are mostly a low priority for a moment, since most of them are planned to be found later in the game than the first chapter, which is where I am currently focusing my development effort. If I don’t feel like that stuff then creating assets and level details for the first couple areas, finishing the mentioned background image, or building improving tilesets are also strong possibilities for productive work to do next.

 

In a bit of a weird spot right now. I’ve been working on doing the animations for the first and likely most complex non-boss enemy of the game, and I’m starting to feel a bit depressed about it. Working on a bunch of very simple very similar pictures for a few weeks tends to get old, even if you feel proud of the result. I ran into this same issue working on the main character animations, and now as with then I’m going to have to figure out more kinds of work to mix in because this is starting to undermine my motivation to work on the project. I need to remember never to leave myself on the same animation task for more than a week or so, since it tends to do terrible things to my morale after a little while.

Because these guys aren’t quite symmetrical, but I didn’t want to create left and right facing versions, some interesting properties emerged. The most noticeable of these is where they actually momentarily drop their knife and then catch it in their other hand in the running turn animation, which nicely adds to the frantic and panicked feel of the animation and swaps hands so that when they run the other direction it looks natural. The strap holding up their clothing also quietly changes shoulder, and the light shifts to the other side of them, during the turn. I think these weird fudgings of reality will largely be invisible in action, but it was an interesting problem to figure out as I went, since I hadn’t really considered it before.

I had originally planned to make several different shapes of mask for these guys, but I think that’s something I’m unlikely to do now. To create each mask I’d have to do a bunch of drawings of the mask facing in different directions for the turn, add code to make it draw in front of or behind the head based on where they are in the current animation, and make sure the movement perfectly syncs up. That’s possible, but seems like a lot of work for something that might not look very good. Alternately I could just make a bunch of different animations for different masks, which, again, I don’t think will be worth the effort. That said, there are alternate versions of this enemy with different capabilities, so when I make them I can make their masks look different, which will be more communicative and less labor intensive than what I was planning on doing.

That’s mostly it for the last month, though I also did some miscellaneous work fixing bugs in path-finding, improving the cave tileset and building out the caves. The particle system is basically functional but is still not really an improvement on what I had before I started in any way, remaining extremely buggy when run in multi-threaded mode while still not quite performing as well as I’d hoped – for reasons which, as yet, remain mysterious.

I think for the next week or so I should focus on getting all of the editors working  so that I can spend some time detailing the levels, adding foreground and background elements, generally making them feel finished – or as finished as they’re going to get until I finish making enemies for them.

I like these animations, but they’re not much to show for the better part of a month or work. I don’t know what to think about that: It doesn’t feel like I’ve been slacking. Maybe these guys were just difficult to animate.

EveHeader

This was an eventful month! Following my devblog post last month, I started sharing the project on a couple of game dev forums, and through a logical process which eludes me now 30 days later determined that a) I wanted to have the first chapter of the game complete by the end of 2017 and b) that in order to do this I should create a complete task-list and schedule for the project up to that point. This ended up taking me a few days, but I really feel like it was worth it. I now have, printed across 12 pages, a fairly comprehensive list of work that needs to be done in order to complete the first chapter of the game. There’s going to be four chapters total, so a lot of work will remain to complete the game even after all this, but the scope of the work will be determined and I’ll know how much time and effort it takes to create finished content for the game. All major gameplay bugs should get eliminated through this process, and all fundamental design code will be firmly in place.

I broke the schedule up into a total of five three-month blocks, one for the rest of this year and four others for next year. Currently, for this year’s block, I have 24/53 tasks completed or otherwise resolved. I also have a few tasks which I had to add to the list which aren’t accounted for there, as well as a few that are partially complete, but it’s still good progress and I’m proud of how quickly I’m getting the work done. Now, I expect some future tasks to be quite a bit trickier, and I also expect many unforeseen tasks to crop up, but that’s why I’m trying to get ahead of schedule now – as well as acknowledging that December is likely to be so busy with other stuff that I’ll probably only be able to work for half of it.

The biggest task accomplished over this month is the attack animations. All right-facing attack animations are complete – well, except for the occasional mistake or two still to be fixed, a few of which I’m noticing as I watch the attack montage play below. About half of the left-facing attacks are complete as well, and they should progress more quickly on average now that I have the right-facing attacks to use as template and I’ve got so much sprite creation practice. There were a few big sticking points: I realized after mostly completing them that the original standing attack animation was a) boring and b) functionally redundant with the running attack animation. I’ve since replaced the former with the latter, but fortunately not all was lost: I was able to use the standing attack frames to resolve another issue that had cropped up. When I changed the crouching position of the right arm some time ago, I invalidated the entire swing arc of the primary crouching attack animation prototype. However, the new arm position made perfect sense for the motion of the unused standing attack animation, so I just pulled the torso from those frames into the crouch animation. I still had to redo the leg positions from scratch, but it was a nice shortcut into creating a good expressive attack.

attackmontage

I’ve also been working on the music for the game. The first few areas largely have completed music tracks already, since I created music concurrent with them to figure out the tone I was going for, but as I made that music like five years ago there’s a lot of rough edges in those old tracks and they’re not necessarily well set up to work with the systems I want to have in place for the game. That is to say, I’m not planning on just creating a loop for each area, but having some degree of adaptive music based on where specifically the player is in an area and what the game state of that area is. Thus, I’ve been remastering the old tracks, making small composition tweaks, and rearranging the parts to make jumping between them work better. Fortunately, I found that by setting timers and jump points, I could very elegantly skip between segments of an adaptive track to switch playback to a new section. Less fortunately, I discovered that a track with tempo changes and heavy use of delay effects is probably the least optimal type of track to feed into such a system. Still, it’s functional for now, even if some of the track transitions sound a bit odd. I’ve at least proven out the basic concept and built the architecture: If I need to change things up a bit later to resolve these issues, it should be quite feasible.

hills

I’ve also been working on tilesets and backgrounds here and there. I made this background very desaturated to create a clear delineation between background areas and gameplay areas, and also to reinforce the misty feel I was going for, but I worry a bit about how well it will work with the extremely vivid and saturated caves background I made before. I really love playing with color in unexpected ways, like I did with making the distance in the caves background a dark vivid red, but consistency is important as well. In the end, that’s something I can only figure out by getting the assets into the game and playing around with them and seeing what works. Really, though, changing palettes is incredibly easy compared to creating new assets, so it probably won’t be a big deal at any rate.

In addition to the backgrounds, I’ve created a number of the transitional tilesets necessary to blend different tilesets together. Now I can have grass tiles next to stone tiles next to dirt tiles without them looking like artificial grid-based garbage. There’s still some gaps in there, tiles that I’ll need to create that I haven’t noticed I’ll need to create, but I can build out most of the environments I want to now, at least at a degree of rough detail.

Over November I plan to finish out all of the character animations and start creating detail assets for the first section of the first chapter – Mostly just different kinds of grass and stone to start with but, again, in many of these cases I won’t know what I’ve forgotten until I get there and find I don’t have it. Still, finishing this game, as distant a goal as it remains, feels more concrete and feasible now than it has in a long time.